A Guide to Places with Pictures and Stories from Life

St Paul’s Cathedral

St Paul's Cathedral Ceiling Feature 1

For more than 1,400 years, a Cathedral dedicated to St Paul has stood at the highest point in the City of London. The present cathedral was designed by Sir Christopher Wren and built during the period 1675 and 1710.   More History.

Photography is not allowed except on a few days each year more here ⇐, which will probably have some information in spring.  I caught the last opportunity this year and so, of course, went overboard.   Admission and charges are here.

To view the astonishing detail of the decor, please click on the image and then again to expand.

The Nave

St Paul's Cathedral Ceiling 1

 

Beside the Dome and the Dome

St Paul's Cathedral Ceiling 4

 

St Paul's Cathedral Inside Dome 1

The gallery at the first level is known as the Whispering Gallery at 30 meters above the cathedral floor.   So called because, when it is quiet, a whisper on one side will travel around the wall and be heard on the other side.

Higher still is the Stone Gallery at 53 meters and the topmost is the Golden Gallery at 85 meters.  If you can climb to the top, they give a you a badge.  😛 .
St Paul's Cathedral Inside Dome 2

 

The Ceiling above the Quire

St Paul's Cathedral Ceiling 2

 

St Paul's Cathedral Ceiling 3

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St Paul's Cathedral Ceiling 6

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St Paul's Cathedral Ceiling 5

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St Paul's Cathedral Ceiling Feature 2

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St Paul's Cathedral Ceiling Feature 3

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St Paul's Cathedral Ceiling Feature 4

 

The High Alter and the Apse

St Paul's Cathedral High Altar

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St Paul's Cathedral Stained Glass

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Carolus Jacobus Blomfied

There are many monuments and dedications at the cathedral.  I chose this one because of the workmanship and for being a little known personage.  It is of course Carolus Jacobus Blomfield.

Here is the famous exterior of the Dome.
St Paul's Dome

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John Wesley outside St Paul'sThis is John Wesley, Father of Methodism.  Another well made statue.

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Horation Nelson at St Paul's CathedralThe Crypt has many tombs, dedications and a cafe.  Perhaps the most famous tomb being that of Viscount Horatio Nelson.  These are some of the dedications.
Wellington at St Paul's Cathedral

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Martin Luher King and St Paul's

Lastly, the cathedral does have its contemporary side and has housed an exhibition of work by street artist Inkie.  Below is one item retained and presently on view just inside the cathedral entrance.
Inkie at St Paul's

14 responses

  1. Now this is one place I have been before but it was many years ago now and I forgot how lovely it was.

    Like

    August 18, 2015 at 17:37

    • As is usual with such places the lighting is not great but the camera compensates and the close-ups improve upon the eye.

      If I’d had more time, there is a lot of history to absorb.

      Like

      August 18, 2015 at 21:23

  2. Oh my word! The detail is astonishing. Do they not usually allow photography because no one would ever leave? 😉

    Liked by 1 person

    August 18, 2015 at 20:12

    • Possibly, but you know what urban photographers are like, they nick stuff. The cathedral used to have a lift. 😀

      Liked by 1 person

      August 18, 2015 at 21:31

  3. Oh this is simply exquisite Graham. Maybe your best ever! Stunning~

    Like

    August 19, 2015 at 00:24

    • Thank you. The camera can certainly get a better view on those high ceilings than the eye. Surprised me when I got I got them on a monitor. It amazes me how they did it without laser measures etc. 😀

      Like

      August 19, 2015 at 18:18

  4. Wow, what a beautiful place – thanks for sharing your photos with us! ❤
    Diana xo

    Like

    August 19, 2015 at 01:34

    • You are welcome and I’m glad you enjoyed. I’m always in awe of the skills they used. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      August 19, 2015 at 18:20

  5. Fabulous photos, Graham!!
    Fabulous photos, Graham!!
    Fabulous photos, Graham!!

    Like

    August 19, 2015 at 07:24

  6. Sorry for the duplication…

    Like

    August 19, 2015 at 07:25

  7. That’s a nice idea, to restrict photography to maintain the atmosphere. And well done you for finding out about it and being there!

    Like

    August 19, 2015 at 14:18

    • Thank you, I came across it almost by accident. Worth watching the link for next years surprises. 🙂

      Like

      August 19, 2015 at 18:23

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